Sea Kayak Trips in Yellowstone, Jackson Hole, Grand Teton Wyoming Kayaking and Canoeing – Sea Kayaking and Guided Fishing Trips, Eco Tours in Yellowstone National Park Kayak Trips in Yellowstone, Jackson Hole, Grand Teton Wyoming Kayaking and Canoeing – Sea Kayaking and Guided Fishing Trips, Eco Tours in yellowstone National Park

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Yellowstone Lake Elk

Much of the country is easing into the fall, but it’s still unseasonably warm in Yellowstone, with daytime temps well into the 60s and very little precipitation. Kayaking on Yellowstone Lake  provides a unique opportunity to view the Park’s amazing geothermal features and get up close to its wonderful wildlife. Right now the Elk are bugling and remaining very active during their mating season. This week we were able to paddle right over to a group of Elk swimming in the lake.

Elk Wading in Yellowstone Lake

Paddling with Elk

 

Unwanted Lake Trout in Yellowstone Lake

The efforts to clear Yellowstone Lake of unwanted lake trout is going high-tech, with 140 trout implanted with radio transmitters to track their movements and show researchers the best places to attack spawning areas.

There are more than 300,000 lake trout in Yellowstone Lake, and there’s a serious effort to eliminate them: they prey on and crowd out native cutthroat trout, severely impacting their numbers. While it’s unlikely the lake trout can ever be totally eliminated (they’re exceedingly hearty), efforts like this can certainly bring the numbers down. If you’re fishing in Yellowstone Lake, it’s mandatory you kill a lake trout if you catch one.

The transmitters, partially purchased by Trout Unlimited, send a signal every one to three minutes to the 28 receivers located on the lake buoys. The data is that analyzed to parse the trout’s movement, with the goal being a map of where the trout are spawning. That area can then be targeted by biologists, it can be electrocuted or the eggs can be removed.

 

Fire in Yellowstone National Park

Though it’s late in the season, there’s still the danger of forest fires in Yellowstone National Park, as lightning caused a new fire near Shoshone Lake— the 21st wildland fire in the Park this summer.

Much of the country is easing into the fall, but it’s still unseasonably warm in Yellowstone, with daytime temps well into the 60s and very little precipitation. As a result, there’s a high level of danger for fire, so NPS officials are on the lookout for anything serious. As this one has the potential to do some damage because of its location — some six miles south of the Old Faithful complex and close to the Shoshone Lake Trail — the three-acre Headwaters Fire will be suppressed by Yellowstone and Gallatin National Forest crews supported by helicopter bucket work.

The fire is located three-quarters of a mile east of the six-acre Trischman Fire, which was suppressed and declared controlled on Sept. 14.

Yellowstone officials are also observing five fires managed collectively since August 25 as the Heart Complex. Because of the minimal activity reported in the group, the fires are being managed separately as the Point, Gibbon, Ouzel, Huckleberry and Pitchstone fires could be handled separately by Yellowstone’s wildland fire managers. These fires are expected to be declared out only after a significant fire season-ending weather event, such as extended days of rain or snow.

In addition, crews continue to monitor the Point Fire on the eastern shore of Yellowstone Lake and provide protection for the Clear Creek Patrol Cabin. The Thorofare Trail remains closed from the Nine Mile Trailhead to one mile south of the fire area.

With the exception of the Point Fire, which has reached approximately 1,800 acres, and the Gibbon Fire, which has reached 24 acres, the remaining fires were each less than two acres. All are being managed to allow natural processes to occur to enhance the area’s natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

The bottom line: None of these fires are impacting visitor activities. There may be times smoke will waft onto roadways, but in general the fires are remote enough where most visitors won’t catch a glimpse of them.

 

Kayaking Yellowstone in September

Fall is a great time to visit Yellowstone National Park. The nights are colder, the leaves are all turning colors, the elk are bugling and all the wildlife are actively getting ready for winter. One of the absolute best ways to enjoy all the natural beauty of Yellowstone is by taking a backcountry kayak trip on Yellowstone Lake or Lewis and Shoshone Lakes.

 

Yellowstone Park visits down slightly in August

Yellowstone National Park saw a decline in recreation visitors last month.

However, with more than 800,000 visitors, the park still recorded its second-busiest August ever.

Yellowstone officials reported 805,173 recreation visitors in August compared with 854,837 for the same month last year, a decline of 5.8 percent.

“We’ve only broken the 800,000 mark in August twice — last year and this year,” Yellowstone spokesman Al Nash said.

“Our August visitation figures are 50,000 more recreational visitors this year than we saw in 2009, and 2009 was a record year, which of course was supplanted by last year,” he said.

Year to date, Yellowstone is reporting 2,653,832 visitors compared with 2,866,401 visitors in 2010 and 2,654,378 visitors in 2009.

 

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